9 Comments
Feb 9, 2022Liked by Mad Ned

Honeywell Multics ran on a 9 bit byte, 36 bit word machine. So maybe you could target that.

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the Nonad makes me think of the Star Trek episode with Nomad. So be careful, before you connect this to anything mobile.

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Thanks for the great information about Holy Nonads! A Nine-Bit Computer! https://2player.co

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I know the name-that-grouping ship has sailed, but I'm just playing for fun here https://geometrydashscratch.com

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I know the name-that-grouping ship has sailed, but I'm just playing for fun here. How about "yx", pronounced like "Mike's" w/o the M? It's a play on IX, of course. Or possibly "nonet", like an octet only bigger.

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thanks for this! Interesting to see the idea of "middle endian", my kind of weird. Also its like the second or third place where they chose to reuse 'byte' to describe a 9-bit quantity. I guess it was more common to use it generically in the past but later became standardized to 8 bits

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Feb 11, 2022Liked by Mad Ned

rather than a 'byte' how about a 'nyne'?

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that's thematically very nice (byte/nine merger). Someone else said they had used the term "Nyte" for a nine-bit byte. Still other references seem to re-use "byte" but just say it's a "nine bit byte". I dunno, I've grown fond of Nonad already due to how weird it sounds though. :-)

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